San Mateo County caregiver writes Alzheimer’s poetry

Linda S is a retired psychologist who has been writing poems since she was 13. When David, her husband of 43 years, was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in 2013 her poetry became an outlet for her to express her feelings. “It got the feelings out of me and onto paper,” said Linda.

Since then, Linda has joined a handful of Alzheimer’s Association® support groups over the years. Linda has found them to be helpful in providing her with resources both about the disease and where to find care for David. Linda said, “The most important thing support groups have given me is the sense that I’m not alone on this journey.”

While attending one such support group she was moved to write this poem about how she thinks her husband may be feeling.

Hiding in full site
by Linda S. of San Mateo County

It takes incredible struggle and courage
Every day just to be
To not know where you are
And how you got there                                                                                      
to fumble on fix its
That used to be easy
As you forget, where you put what
That you just had a minute ago

Others praise you and their words are alien
You want to hide but danger and failure loom and lurk everywhere
And safety and/or protection
Are gone now
And all you can rely on is your anger

And nobody understands
What a
crazy world
you live in

The Alzheimer’s Association offers a writing and poetry support group on the first Thursday of the month from noon to 2 p.m. If you’re interested in participating, or would like to find out more about our support groups, please call our 24/7 Helpline at 800.272.3900.

If you have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or another dementia, you are not alone. There are people who understand what you are going through, and help is available. Learn more at alz.org/ihavealz.

If you are caring for a person with Alzheimer’s or dementia, it often involves a team of people. Whether you provide daily caregiving, participate in decision making, or simply care about a person with the disease — we have resources to help. Learn more at alz.org/care.

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1 Response

  1. Kathy Asfour says:

    Beautiful and so full of truths. So sad.

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